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Summer Flowers In This Section

Projects at the Dartmouth Trauma Interventions Research Center

Current projects

Use of Technology to Engage Traumatized Adolescents in Trauma-Focused Treatment (Jankowski)

Gary Tucker Junior Investigator Award
2015-2016, with potential for another year

Mentors

  • Lisa Marsch, PhD
  • Karen Schifferdecker, PhD, MPH

Overall aim

  • Develop a technology-based prototype to increase engagement of traumatized adolescents in trauma-focused treatment

Our Minds, Our Voice: Empowering Foster Children and their Caregivers in Psychotropic Medication Decisions (Barnett)

Mentors

  • Bob Drake, MD, PhD
  • Burl Daviss, MD
  • Consultant: Elizabeth Carpenter-Song, PhD

Overall aim

  • Understand the decision-making and oversight processes involved with the use of antipsychotics in foster children from the perspectives of foster parents and former foster youth.

Background

  • Use of antipsychotics steeply inclining and controversial, particularly in foster children
  • Decision aids have increased knowledge, satisfaction, and engagement with health care decisions in many health fields, often resulting in patients choosing more conservative treatments

Specific aim

  • Identify knowledge, perspectives, decision-making processes, and oversight processes relevant to the use of antipsychotics in foster children through qualitative interviews with foster/adoptive parents (n = 10) and former foster youth (n = 10)

Methods/analyses

  • Semi-structured phone interviews
  • Qualitative analyses using Dedoose software

Our Minds Our Choice: Developing and Pilot-Testing an Option Grid for the Use of Antipsychotics in Children (Barnett)

Gary Tucker Junior Investigator Award
2015-2016, with potential for another year

Mentors

  • Bob Drake, MD, PhD
  • Burl Daviss, MD
  • Consultant: Glyn Elwyn, MD, MSc, FRCGP, PhD

Overall aim

  • Engage children and their caregivers in fully-informed decisions related to the use of antipsychotic medications versus alternative interventions through an Option Grid™ decision aid

Background

  • Status quo pharmacological care for children has led to a dramatic rise in the use of antipsychotics that has outreached its empirical support and safety parameters
  • Alternative medications and psychosocial interventions with comparable effects and more favorable risk/benefit ratios may be a better option for some children and families, when available.
  • No tools exist to present simple, standardized, research-based information to help children and caregivers evaluate treatment options.
  • Option Grids™ provide patients with simple information, based on scientific research, about treatment options during clinical encounters.

Specific aims (Year 1)

  • Aim 1: Identify the most relevant user content and scientific evidence to inform development of an Option Grid™ for children and their caregivers considering antipsychotic medications.
  • Aim 2: Evaluate user-experience principles with former youth, caregivers, and prescribers (n = 6) following user-testing.
  • Aim 3: Evaluate user-experience principles, as well as caregiver engagement and decisional conflict, following patient-prescriber clinical encounters (n = 4).

Methods/analyses

  • Qualitative semi-structured interviews based on user-experience principles (purpose, clarity, relevance) and knowledge gained, credibility, feasibility, changes in decisional conflict.

Partners for Change: Improving the social and emotional well-being of NH children involved with child welfare (PFC)

Funded by DHHS Administration for Children and Families
This 5 year demonstration grant is a collaboration between DTIRC and the NH Department of Children, Youth, and Families. The project aims to improve the social and emotional well-being of children in NH child welfare system through universal screening, assessment, evidence-based treatment, progress monitoring, and psychotropic medication oversight.

NH Adoption Preparation and Preservation (NHAPP)

Funded by DHHS Administration for Children and Families
This 5 year demonstration grant is a collaboration between DTIRC and the NH Department of Children, Youth, and Families. The goal of the project is to create child serving systems in which children to be adopted and already adopted through the state of NH and their families have access to trauma-informed, adoption competent, evidence-based services.

Prior projects

Breakthrough Series Collaborative (BSC)

Funded by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network/SAMHSA
Partnership between DTIRC and NH Department of Children, Youth, and Families to increase placement stability for children in foster care through trauma-sensitive practices in child welfare and improved collaboration with mental health providers.

NH Bridge Project

Funded by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network/SAMHSA
Implemented mental health screening and treatment referral processes across 5 NH juvenile justice courts through partnerships with family court judges.

Project Prevent

Funded by NH Endowment for Health
Enhanced access to evidence-based evaluation and trauma treatment (Child-Parent Psychotherapy) for children ages 0-6 and their families in 4 community-based agencies across NH by training over 20 clinicians in the model.

Project for Adolescent Trauma Treatment (PATT) and New Hampshire Child/Adolescent Trauma Telehealth Project

Funded by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network/SAMHSA, NH Endowment for Health, Fidelity Foundation
Implemented an evidence-based treatment for traumatized children, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, in every community mental health center in NH. We have trained over 300 providers in TF-CBT and continue to provide training and consultation through other initiatives. We also established a videoconference network to allow for weekly supervision of clinicians by DTIRC and national experts.

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