Walking Tours

Take one of our suggested walking tours of the art at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Details from the artwork you will see are below.

You can also find walking tour information in the Guide to the Art at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (PDF).

From the Faulkner Building

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"Kancamagus Pass," by Bruce Martin

Begin your tour at the South Information Desk on Level 4. Directly behind the desk there is a 10-part photograph by Bruce Martin of Boston. In this piece, entitled "Kancamagus Pass," Martin captures the tranquility of this well-known vista.

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"Bright Exuberance," by Wolf Kahn

To the left of the information desk, directly across from the Parking Garage entrance, "Bright Exuberance," a vibrant pastel by Wolf Kahn, serves as a warm welcome to visitors.

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Untitled, by Ellen Mears Kennedy

Walk back towards the lobby and the mall. On your right, you will find two untitled works by Ellen Mears Kennedy in handmade paper. Notice how the design shifts and moves as you walk by.

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"Sunrise" by Elizabeth MacDonald

Take the main stairs or the lobby elevator down to Level 3. On the lobby walls, two ceramic tile panels, "Sunrise" and "Sunset," are installed. The artist, Elizabeth MacDonald, makes each tile by hand, pressing pure pigment into the wet terracotta.

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"Granite Statement," by Peter Thibeault

On the wall to the left of the elevator, the mixed-media installation by Peter Thibeault entitled Granite Statement combines natural materials found in New Hampshire. To the left of this sculpture, you will find the entrance to the clinics.

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"Spring Waterway," by Petria Mitchell

Walk down this hallway until you get to the large oil painting across from the stairs. In this work, "Spring Waterway," Petria Mitchell celebrates the beauty of the Upper Valley as it emerges from a long winter.

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"Big Pale Yellow," by Eric Aho

Take the stairs or elevator up to Level 4. Across from the stairs is another large painting. "Big Pale Yellow," by Vermont artist Eric Aho, captures another familiar scene: mist rising off the river as it winds through the valley.

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"Summer Fog II," by Clifford Smith

Next, take the elevator or stairs up one more flight, to Level 5. Clifford Smith's "Summer Fog II" recalls the tranquility of early mornings on the water, with the sun casting pinks tones onto the fog.

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"Summer Fog II," by Clifford Smith

Now, turn around and look up! The two-story suspended sculpture in the atrium was designed by Seattle artist Koryn Rolstad specifically for this space. Crafted from aluminum and wire mesh, it recalls the artist Henri Matisse's cutouts, hence its name, "Matisse Leaves."

To end your tour, take the elevator or stairs to Level 6. This is the CHaD Outpatient Center. Many wonderful works of art create a welcoming environment for our youngest patients. As you walk through the clinic waiting areas towards the elevators, the captivating "LifeTiles" by Rufus Butler Seder seem to come alive as you pass by.

From the Main Rotunda

From the Main Rotunda, you can enjoy a changing exhibition located in the glass cases to the left of the main entrance. Now, turn around and walk down the corridor towards the clinic waiting areas areas and the East Mall. When you come to a mini-rotunda, look up! You will see "The Tile Project"—a collaboration among the community, patients, staff and a former visiting artist, Emile Birch.

Continue down the corridor until you reach the East Mall. Take a left and walk towards the Emergency Department entrance. The set of five prints located at the end of the mall were created by Amparo Carvajal-Hufschmid using a woodblock process. The incredibly rich texture of these works is based on the wood grain found on old barns.

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"Owls" by Jim Sardonis

Take the elevators up to Level 4. As you approach the East Mall, you will find a granite sculpture on your left entitled "Owls." This work is by Jim Sardonis, an artist known for his portrayal of animals in family groups.

Return to the elevators. Notice the picture of the barn hanging in between them. "The Long Barn" by Margaret Lampe Kannenstine was produced using a monotype process whereby acrylic is painted onto a plexiglass plate and then transferred to paper, resulting in a one-of-a-kind image.

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"Allowance," by Doug Trump

Now, take the elevator or stairs up to Level 5. On the back wall, next to the conference room, you will see Doug Trump's "Allowance," an oil painting on canvas, which does not depict a particular scene or object.

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"Flora, Fauna, Aqua," by Nancy Gutkin O'Neil

To end your tour, walk back down the mall. When you reach the elevators, take them to Level 2. In the lobby, "Flora, Fauna, Aqua" by the artist Nancy Gutkin O'Neil, illuminates the space. O'Neil uses many techniques, including silkscreening, etching and handpainting on glass in her work. See how many different plants and animals you can find.